6 Best Replacements For Beef Tallow

beef tallow substitute

There are many recipes that call for beef tallow, but what can you do if you don’t have any of this fat?

Actually, it turns out very easy to find a good substitute for beef tallow in different cooking recipes.

Keep reading and learn more about beef tallow as well as the six best replacements for it.

What is beef tallow?

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Beef tallow is made by rendering pure beef fat (or called beef suet) that is typically found in the kidneys of the cows.

After being completely rendered, beef tallow has a soft but solid texture.

Tallow is shelf-stable and does not need to be refrigerated like butter or mayonnaise.

It is kept at room temperature and away from direct heat and light.

Beef tallow has many uses in cooking, from baking to frying, and was even used to make soap.

The high heat tolerant property makes tallow an ideal replacement for other kinds of regular oil when frying or baking foods at high temperatures.

It will withstand higher temperatures without breaking down into trans-fatty acids like most vegetable oils would if heated too long.

Beef tallow also adds a rich taste to the dishes it is used in.

Can you substitute beef tallow in cooking recipes?

Yes, you can easily replace beef tallow in any cooking recipe with other options.

Tallow has many benefits that make it a great option when it comes to frying or baking foods as it has less saturated fat and lasts longer on the shelf.

However, chances are sometimes you cannot find a jar of store-bought beef tallow or just some raw beef fat to make your own tallow.

The good news is it is easily substituted with many other ingredients available on the market.

But one thing to keep in mind is that each substitute will work in specific recipes so you need to use them properly to result in the best dish without messing things up.

What can you substitute for beef tallow?

So what can be used in place of beef tallow? Let’s take a look at the following ideas:

1. Pork lard

Pork lard is another staple animal fat that can be used interchangeably with beef tallow.

Pork lard is rendered pork fat, so it is exactly the same as beef tallow except for the origin of the raw fat.

Pork lard is widely used in Southeast Asian cuisine, but it can be easily made at home in any cuisine if you can buy some pure pork fat.

Pork lard has the same texture and also shares the same uses with beef tallow.

So feel free to use pork lard in any recipe that calls for beef tallow with the same quantity.

2. Chicken fat

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Chicken fat can also be a good substitute for beef tallow.

Chicken fat is also prized for being high in linoleic acid and omega-6 fatty acid, making it a healthy choice though.

Chicken fat is commonly used to flavor baked goods, soups, stews, or as a breaded coat rather than as a frying fat, but it will be fine to use chicken fat to fry foods.

3. Butter

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If you have a lot of butter in your kitchen, just use it in place of beef tallow.

Butter is a dairy product that has been a staple in American cuisine.

It helps add flavor and texture to most of the dishes, especially baking or pan-searing.

Since butter has a lower smoke point than tallow, it is not a good idea to substitute butter for beef tallow in deep-frying recipes.

4. Vegetable shortening

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Vegetable shortening is the fourth suggestion that you would try to substitute for your favorite beef tallow in case this cooking fat is out of stock.

Vegetable shortening is completely vegan because it is typically made from hydrogenated vegetable oils.

It has a solid texture and high smoke point that can be great for both frying and baking recipes.

5. Vegetable oil

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Vegetable oil has been a very popular choice of cooking fat on the market today.

It has little by little replaced animal fat because of its convenience.

There are different kinds of vegetable oil that you can find in your local grocery stores or supermarkets, such as canola oil, soybean oil, or sunflower oil.

Vegetable oil is often used to fry or stir-fry foods rather than to add richness to your baked dishes because it is typically tasteless.

6. Olive oil

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Our last recommendation for a beef tallow substitute is olive oil.

This kind of oil is made from olive fruits, so it is different from most vegetable oils that are made from nuts or seeds.

Olive oil is widely used in Middleterranean cuisine, but now it can be found in any cuisine in the world.

However, olive oil is a bit pricier than other kinds of fat.

It is typically used to coat salads, marinade ingredients, or for sauteing recipes instead of deep-frying or baking dishes.

The bottom line

Beef tallow is a staple in many kitchens and cuisines.

It is a type of cooking fat that you should have in your kitchen.

However, in case you are unable to find or make some beef tallow, it is surprisingly easy to find an alternative, from vegan to non-vegan ones.

With our suggestions for the best beef tallow substitutes mentioned above, you can still prepare the best meals without using beef tallow even if the recipes call for this ingredient.